titleauthordatecontentpermalinkimageexcerptcategorycategoryidsitetitleauthordatecontentpermalinkimageexcerptcategorycategoryidsitetitleauthordatecontentpermalinkimageexcerptcategorycategoryidsitetitleauthordatecontentpermalinkimageexcerptcategorycategoryidsitetitleauthordatecontentpermalinkimageexcerptcategorycategoryidsitetitleauthordatecontentpermalinkimageexcerptcategorycategoryidsitetitleauthordatecontentpermalinkimageexcerptcategorycategoryidsitetitleauthordatecontentpermalinkimageexcerptcategorycategoryidsitetitleauthordatecontentpermalinkimageexcerptcategorycategoryidsitetitleauthordatecontentpermalinkimageexcerptcategorycategoryidsite[%title%]Investment firm acquires Lieb Vineyards, Premium Wine Group[%title%][%author%]Tim Kelly[%author%][%date%]March 28, 2013[%date%][%content%][caption id="attachment_34453" align="aligncenter" width="500"]Lieb, Craft restaurants GIANNA VOLPE FILE PHOTO | Lieb Cellars director of sales John Morales (from left), advertising consultant Peter Pace and owner Mark Lieb in front of the the Cutchogue tasting room.[/caption] A New York-based investment company has purchased both the Lieb Cellars vineyard and winery in Cutchogue and the Premium Wine Group in Mattituck for an undisclosed amount, the winery announced Thursday morning. Southport Lane, a private equity firm, is combining the two businesses into company. Mark Lieb, who founded Lieb Cellars and co-founded the Premium Wine Group, which makes wines for vineyards without production facilities, will serve as chairman of the board of the new company. Peter Pace, who has worked for both firms for 14 months, is the new firm's managing director. Ron Goerler, president of the Long Island Wine Council, said the deal shows both the strength of the wine industry and its potential. "It shows that someone feels very confident in the ability for Lieb to grow," said Mr. Goerler, who owns and operates Jamesport Vineyards. "It looks to a bright future for our industry." Alexander Burns, chief strategist for Southport Lane, said in a press release, "The team's passion for the business reflects our belief in the strength and quality of these companies, The combination or our expertise, along with Peter's marketing strengths, gives us an even stronger operation." Lieb Vineyards, which was founded in 1992, includes 62 acres of grapes and two tasting rooms. Read more about Lieb Cellars[%content%][%permalink%]http://magazine.timesreview.com/liwinepress/2013/03/28/investment-firm-acquires-lieb-vineyards-premium-wine-group/[%permalink%][%image%]http://media.timesreview.com.s3.amazonaws.com/suffolktimes/files/Lieb_gv_C.jpg[%image%][%excerpt%]A New York-based investment company has purchased both the Lieb Cellars vineyard and winery in Cutchogue and the Premium Wine Group in Mattituck for an undisclosed amount, the winery announced Thursday morning. Southport Lane, a private equity firm, is combining the two businesses into company. Mark Lieb, who founded Lieb Cellars and co-founded the Premium […][%excerpt%][%category%]Featured,Wine[%category%][%categoryid%]4,6[%categoryid%][%site%]http://magazine.timesreview.com/liwinepress[%site%][%title%]For third time, North Fork chef nominated for Beard award[%title%][%author%]Tim Kelly[%author%][%date%]March 19, 2013[%date%][%content%][caption id="attachment_38626" align="aligncenter" width="500"] GIANNA VOLPE FILE PHOTO | Gerry Hayden outside North Fork Table & Inn, where he works as chef and co-owner.[/caption] For the third consecutive year, Gerry Hayden, chef and co-owner of North Fork Table & Inn in Southold, is a finalist for a James Beard award, one of the most prestigious honors in the culinary world, in the best chef in the Northeastern U.S. category. Mr. Hayden is one of five finalists in the region covering New York and all six New England States. He's up against Jamie Bissonnette of the Coppa Restaurant in Boston, Joanne Chang of the Flour Bakery & Cafe, also in Boston; Melissa Kelly of Primo, Rockland, Maine and Barry Maiden of the Hungry Mother is Cambridge, MA. The awards in 59 categories will be be announced during a ceremony at the Avery Fisher Hall in Lincoln Center in New York of May 6. Founded in 1986, The James Beard Foundation describes itself as dedicated "to celebrating, nurturing, and preserving America's diverse culinary heritage and future." It's named after cookbook author and teacher James Beard, a champion of American cuisine who died in 1985. The James Beard Foundation, which sponsors the annual awards, maintains the James Beard House in Greenwich Village as a performance space for visiting chefs. Mr. Hayden grew up in Setauket and began working in restaurants in junior high school when he took a job as a dishwasher at a Stony Brook eatery. In an interview after receiving his second Beard award nomination last year, he said, "When people come out to eat, they expect a show. I don’t want people to come here and say, ‘Oh I could have made that at home.’ That’s not dining to me.” tkelly@timesreview.com[%content%][%permalink%]http://magazine.timesreview.com/liwinepress/2013/03/19/for-third-time-north-fork-chef-nominated-for-beard-award/[%permalink%][%image%]http://media.timesreview.com.s3.amazonaws.com/suffolktimes/files/DSC0031.jpg[%image%][%excerpt%]For the third consecutive year, Gerry Hayden, chef and co-owner of North Fork Table & Inn in Southold, is a finalist for a James Beard award, one of the most prestigious honors in the culinary world, in the best chef in the Northeastern U.S. category. Mr. Hayden is one of five finalists in the region […][%excerpt%][%category%]Featured,Food,Lifestyle[%category%][%categoryid%]4,5,8[%categoryid%][%site%]http://magazine.timesreview.com/liwinepress[%site%][%title%]Award-winning chef purchases North Fork Oyster Company[%title%][%author%]Carrie Miller[%author%][%date%]March 17, 2013[%date%][%content%][caption id="attachment_37632" align="aligncenter" width="500"]BARBARAELLEN KOCH FILE PHOTO Keith Luce demonstrates how he makes sea salt for a previous Suffolk Times article. BARBARAELLEN KOCH FILE PHOTO  |  Keith Luce demonstrates how he makes sea salt for a previous Suffolk Times article.[/caption] Chef Keith Luce now has a new kitchen to run. The award-winning former White House chef announced today he has purchased the North Fork Oyster Company in Greenport's historic Stirling Square with the newly formed NoFo Hospitality Holding LLC. Mr. Luce is the company’s majority shareholder. But that is just the beginning. A soon-to-launch casual café is also in the works, offering freshly-baked flatbreads, sweets, snacks, gelato and sandwiches, prepared from artisan products made by Mr. Luce, according to a release. The café will also feature his new signature cured meats and sausages, thanks in part to Mr. Luce’s success with a Kickstarter campaign. By March 3, he raised more than $50,000 to help bring that vision to life. “It’s long been a dream of mine to create a unique North Fork dining destination for visitors and locals alike – one that brings together the best of the food, drink and produce that the area has to offer,” Mr. Luce said in the release. “We’re thrilled to be able to bring this to life in Stirling Square – a charming ‘diamond-in-the-rough’ in the heart of Greenport.” Stirling Square will also become home to on-site tasting room, where guests can “sample interesting NY-produced beer, wine and spirits, shop for provisions, participate in cooking or food and beverage pairing classes, or even enjoy small acoustic musical performances,” according to the release. Greenport’s freshly enhanced Stirling Square is slated to open in early May 2013, according to the release. North Fork Oyster Company will remain open for business and continue operating under its existing name throughout the transition. Mr. Luce's partners include his wife Marta, Scott and Veronica Hunzinger and Jason and Kara Graves, who together hold expertise in finance, marketing and business development. Their mission is to augment the local North Fork dining experience and to continue fostering the growth of Greenport as a top seaside destination. North Fork Oyster Company was featured in The New York Times in May 2012. cmiller@timesreview.com[%content%][%permalink%]http://magazine.timesreview.com/liwinepress/2013/03/17/award-winning-chef-purchases-north-fork-oyster-company/[%permalink%][%image%]http://media.timesreview.com.s3.amazonaws.com/suffolktimes/files/Keith-Luce-Love-Lane-Market.jpg[%image%][%excerpt%]Chef Keith Luce now has a new kitchen to run. The award-winning former White House chef announced today he has purchased the North Fork Oyster Company in Greenport’s historic Stirling Square with the newly formed NoFo Hospitality Holding LLC. Mr. Luce is the company’s majority shareholder. But that is just the beginning. A soon-to-launch casual […][%excerpt%][%category%]Featured,Food[%category%][%categoryid%]4,5[%categoryid%][%site%]http://magazine.timesreview.com/liwinepress[%site%][%title%]North Fork chef to appear on episode of ‘Chopped’ next month[%title%][%author%]Carrie Miller[%author%][%date%]February 24, 2013[%date%][%content%][caption id="attachment_38202" align="aligncenter" width="500"] CARRIE MILLER PHOTO | Stephan Bogardus of North Fork Table & Inn will take his cooking game to the small screen next month on an episode of Food Network's 'Chopped.'[/caption] If you watch the popular Food Network contest show "Chopped," you'll have a local chef to root for in an episode airing next month. Stephan Bogardus of Southold, chef de cuisine at The North Fork Table & Inn, will appear in an episode set to air at 10 p.m. March 12. Mr. Bogardus, 25, learned his way around the kitchen working at several East End eateries. The chef, who speaks four languages, originally planned on attending law school, but was not accepted into any good schools, he said. On the advice of another chef, he attended the Culinary Institute of America, graduating in 2009. Not long after, he made his was back to the North Fork. Mr. Bogardus said Gerry Hayden, executive chef of The North Fork Table & Inn, recommended him to "Chopped" producers. The show pits four chefs against each other competing for a chance to win $10,000. The challenge is to take a mystery basket of ingredients and turn them into dishes that are judged on creativity, presentation, and taste — with minimal time to plan and execute — a description of the show reads. We sat down with Mr. Bogardus this week to discuss his career and his experience on the show: Q. What would you say your specialty is? A. What we have here at the North Fork Table & Inn, American cuisine and comfort food. Fresh local ingredients, they naturally display the pristine of the North Fork. Q. Were you able to bring any North Fork flare to any of your dishes? A. Absolutely. I like to feel being a native and a local out here, I brought a lot of personality and Long Island pride to the show for sure. Q. One of the ingredients in the first round was beef tongue, had you ever worked with it before? A. I make smoked beef tongue here at the restaurant. We purchased all the cows from Russell McCall at McCall Ranch this year, and so every two weeks we received a whole cow, that had the tongue in it. So I always did some kind of cure. I was quite aware of the ingredient. Q. What was the most challenging aspect of the competition? A. The timing is really, really hard. I had practiced a couple of times with twenty-minute increments and mystery baskets and things, it goes so much faster when you are in the studio. It was hands down the most challenging 20 minutes of my life. Not only having to do what they ask you, to put together the best plate against these talented individuals, then there are cameras and lights and cords running across the floor you had to jump over. Something they did in the pantry, they put ingredients all over the place. It’s not all organized and together. There's a lot of hunting and pecking that you have to do to assemble. Q. Do you think your young age was an asset, or did it hinder your performance? A. It was definitely a double-edged sword. It was great because I feel like a lot of the competitors underestimated me, but it was also challenging because my level of experience did not match most others. I would consider myself the least experienced of all the individuals. Q. How did it feel to be selected as a contestant? A. I knew I was being considered to be a contestant, but never in my wildest dreams did I think I would be selected. I’m just a 25-year-old from Southold, I never thought I’d be on TV. It was a life-changing experience. It was truly an honor to be chosen as a competitor. There was really an acknowledgment toward years of hard work and experience, on a national level, which is pretty sweet. cmiller@timesreview.com[%content%][%permalink%]http://magazine.timesreview.com/liwinepress/2013/02/24/north-fork-chef-to-appear-on-episode-of-chopped-next-month/[%permalink%][%image%]http://media.timesreview.com.s3.amazonaws.com/suffolktimes/files/Stephan-Bogardus-North-Fork-Table-Chopped.jpg[%image%][%excerpt%]If you watch the popular Food Network contest show “Chopped,” you’ll have a local chef to root for in an episode airing next month. Stephan Bogardus of Southold, chef de cuisine at The North Fork Table & Inn, will appear in an episode set to air at 10 p.m. March 12. Mr. Bogardus, 25, learned his […][%excerpt%][%category%]Featured,Food,Lifestyle[%category%][%categoryid%]4,5,8[%categoryid%][%site%]http://magazine.timesreview.com/liwinepress[%site%][%title%]Noted local chef to serve as culinary director of Suffolk Theater[%title%][%author%]Wine Press[%author%][%date%]February 23, 2013[%date%][%content%][caption id="attachment_43694" align="aligncenter" width="500"] COURTESY PHOTO | Acclaimed local chef Tom Schaudel, shown here at his restaurant Jewel in Huntington, has signed on as culinary director at the new Suffolk Theater in Riverhead.[/caption] The Suffolk Theater is set to open in downtown Riverhead next week and a familiar face has joined the team. Chef Tom Schaudel, best known on the North Fork as the owner of acclaimed restaurants A Mano and Alure, has signed on as culinary director of the theater. In that capacity, he'll oversee the theater's full-service restaurant and two bars. A graduate of The Culinary Institute, Mr. Schaudel opened his first restaurant on Long Island 30 years ago. Mr. Schaudel's first order of business in his new role was to collaborate with the theater's food and beverage manager Lawrence Smith on a special cocktail for opening night March 2. See a recipe for the drink, dubbed The Lord Suffolk Cocktail, below: THE ‘LORD SUFFOLK’ COCKTAIL Stir in mixing glass with ice & strain 1 3/4 oz Hendricks* gin (5 cl, 7/16 gills) 1/4 oz Cointreau (6 dashes, 1/16 gills) 1/4 oz sweet vermouth (6 dashes, 1/16 gills) 1/4 oz maraschino liqueur (6 dashes, 1/16 gills) Add lemon twist Serve in a cocktail glass (4.5 oz)[%content%][%permalink%]http://magazine.timesreview.com/liwinepress/2013/02/23/noted-local-chef-to-serve-as-culinary-director-of-suffolk-theater/[%permalink%][%image%]http://media.timesreview.com.s3.amazonaws.com/riverheadnewsreview/files/tom-schaudel-suffolk-theater.jpg[%image%][%excerpt%]The Suffolk Theater is set to open in downtown Riverhead next week and a familiar face has joined the team. Chef Tom Schaudel, best known on the North Fork as the owner of acclaimed restaurants A Mano and Alure, has signed on as culinary director of the theater. In that capacity, he’ll oversee the theater’s […][%excerpt%][%category%]Featured,Food,Lifestyle[%category%][%categoryid%]4,5,8[%categoryid%][%site%]http://magazine.timesreview.com/liwinepress[%site%][%title%]Brewers, farmers helping L.I. Wine Country diversify on drinks[%title%][%author%]Gianna Volpe[%author%][%date%]February 23, 2013[%date%][%content%][caption id="attachment_43654" align="aligncenter" width="500"]Greenport Harbor GIANNA VOLPE PHOTO | Kaitlen Berry, Greenport Harbor Brewing Company's tasting room manager, pulls a pint.[/caption] As the East End continues to polish its image as a leading wine region, a new effort’s a-brewing to turn the region into a destination for craft beer enthusiasts. Last month, Wine Enthusiast Magazine named the North and South Forks one of the world’s top wine destinations for 2013. In concert with that, two new Riverhead breweries are in the works, Greenport Harbor Brewing Company is expanding, and local farmers have begun to grow hops, an important ingredient in beer. “If you have three, four or five breweries out here, then people can make a day trip out of coming to the area for craft beer,” said brewer Greg Doroski of Greenport Harbor Brewing Company. “Its becoming a destination similar to the vineyards.” Mr. Doroski noted that the expansion of the local beer industry is similar to what’s happened in Brooklyn, with its trendy craft beer scene. And, he added, Greenport and Riverhead seem to be developing similarly to the way Brooklyn has been gentrifying. “Growing up out here in Greenport, I can notice the difference. Greenport and Riverhead used to be a little more rough around the edges, but things are changing,” he said. “In Riverhead you have the hotel, the aquarium, the apartments, Long Ireland Beer Company, The Riverhead Project and out here you’ve always had Bruce’s, but now you have places like The Blue Canoe and First and South — there’s more high-end farm-to-table stuff going on.” When it comes to brewing, Riverhead has an advantage over the rest of the North Fork, Mr. Doroski said, because it offers sewer connections. “Having sewers makes it an easier place to open breweries,” he said. “There’s also more commercial industrial space.” Riverhead’s Crooked Ladder Brewing Company is well on its way to opening its doors. Digger O’Dell is about to install a new 16-beer tap system to serve Crooked Ladder and other local brews, and the people behind Moustache Brewing Company recently entered into a lease for a commercial building in Polish Town. Does Riverhead believe it’s on its way to grabbing the craft beer crown? “Absolutely,” Riverhead Supervisor Sean Walter said. “One hundred percent. There’s a method to our madness about how the downtown is coming up. Becoming a craft brewing mecca will have a positive effect on both Polish Town and downtown. I love the wineries and I do like my chianti or a glass of merlot, but I’m a beer drinker so I concentrate on what I know.” Mr. Walter said he is happy to see the camaraderie between Long Ireland, an established local beer maker, and brewers just starting out. Long Ireland, which opened in 2011, seems to be thriving, he said. The Central Islip couple behind Moustache brewery, Matt and Lauri Spitz, said they chose Riverhead over other Long Island locations because of the town’s encouragement. “Riverhead was one of the only towns to welcome us with open arms,” said Mr. Spitz. “A lot of the towns we talked to weren’t sure what to do with a brewery.” But Riverhead, he said, “is trying to revitalize and pull small businesses in, which is great.” Through Kickstarter, an online fundraising website, the couple pulled in more than $30,000 in start-up capital for their brewery, which Ms. Spitz said she hopes will contribute to the “blooming” of the East End as a craft beer destination. “Now we have two breweries and a brew pub in Riverhead,” said Ms. Spitz. “Between that and the wineries, it’s going to be great.” Growing along with the craft beer industry is its sister business, cultivating hops. Hops, the flower of the Humulus lupulus plant, are used in the brewing process to offset the sweetness of malt sugars and add aroma to beer. A century ago New York produced most of the hops grown in the U.S. Today, that distinction is shared by the Pacific Northwest and Midwest. Wading River farmer John Condzella wants to change that and make the burgeoning local beer industry even more local. However, the fourth generation farmer had a difficult time making the most of his farm’s first 800-pound hop harvest this past spring using nothing but human hands. “We were even having hops-induced nightmares from the picking,” he said, laughing. And because Mr. Condzella’s hops plants are still maturing, he estimates they will produce between 1,200 and 1,500 pounds next season. “It takes about an hour for someone to harvest one plant and we’re going to be doubling our hop yard this spring,” he said. He plans to plant an acre’s worth of Willamette, Perle, and Fuggle hops varieties to bring his hop yard to two acres. He is currently raising money through Kickstarter to import a Wolf WHE 140 Hopfen Pflückmaschine harvester from Germany for cooperative use among North Fork growers. One of these growers is Peconic hops farmer Andrew Tralka. “We just got our license for Farm to Pint,” said Mr. Tralka. “We hope to educate people about hops, to show them what they look like, and the North Fork is the perfect spot for it.” A harvester would mean more local hops, enabling the growing number of local breweries to make a wet-hopped ale, which requires fresh hops. “The Wolf has the ability to harvest an acre of hops in an eight-hour day with two people operating the machine,” Mr. Condzella said. “If hand-picking, it would take about 500 hours for the same two people.” Mr. Condzella said he is in a rush to raise $27,000 to bring the harvester to the North Fork and eliminate “a serious barrier to producing local hops. We want to create a sense of urgency because we feel that sense of urgency and want to show we’re very serious in what we’re doing,” he said. “We want to show the local beer movement is strong. It’s an exciting time for craft and local beer on Long Island. The people involved are very passionate.” gvolpe@timesreview.com[%content%][%permalink%]http://magazine.timesreview.com/liwinepress/2013/02/23/brewers-farmers-helping-l-i-wine-country-diversify-on-drinks/[%permalink%][%image%]http://media.timesreview.com.s3.amazonaws.com/riverheadnewsreview/files/beer_gv_C.jpg[%image%][%excerpt%]As the East End continues to polish its image as a leading wine region, a new effort’s a-brewing to turn the region into a destination for craft beer enthusiasts. Last month, Wine Enthusiast Magazine named the North and South Forks one of the world’s top wine destinations for 2013. In concert with that, two new […][%excerpt%][%category%]Featured,Lifestyle,Wine[%category%][%categoryid%]4,8,6[%categoryid%][%site%]http://magazine.timesreview.com/liwinepress[%site%][%title%]Brew-pub-style restaurant in the works for Peconic[%title%][%author%]Gianna Volpe[%author%][%date%]February 23, 2013[%date%][%content%][caption id="attachment_38172" align="aligncenter" width="500"] GIANNA VOLPE PHOTO | Greenport Harbor Brewing Company co-owner Rich Vandenburgh in front of the company's new Peconic location.[/caption] Though the Greenport Harbor Brewing Company is still taking baby steps to get the its Peconic location up and running, owner Rich Vandenburgh has not stopped dreaming big. The Southold resident told The Suffolk Times he’d like to run a brew-pub-style restaurant at the property. “The property is just under three acres so we’d have that ability there, and it’s kind of the ideal space for one,” Mr. Vandenburgh said. “We’re keeping [the Greenport location], that’s our heart and soul, but the new property would allow us to cultivate the brew pub restaurant side of the business.” Building a brew pub in Southold would reflect local and national expansions of the craft beer industry. Not only are two new breweries already in the works in Riverhead just two months into 2013, but Mr. Vandenburgh said the number of U.S. brewers registered with the Brewer’s Association has also been on the rise. “When we first started three years ago there were just about 1,200 brewers nationwide,” he said. “Last time I checked, that number was over 2,000, with 700 to 1,000 breweries in planning. Long Island hasn’t historically been a leader in the craft beer world, but I think there’s a lot of talented, motivated people that recognize there’s a lot of room in the Long Island market for good craft beer.” His advice for those thinking about getting into the brew game? “Just do it,” he said. “Don’t worry about failure. If you’re passionate about what you’re doing then go for it. Start out small and build it up; that’s what’s happening with us.” Though Mr. Vandenburgh said he is in favor of making his brew pub dreams a reality, he said some local restaurants and pubs aren’t so hot on the idea. “We’ve gotten some pushback,” he said, “We explain to those people who bristle that it’s not an us-against-you thing. There needs to be a chorus where we’re all singing together to raise an appeal to the East End.” He said developing the East End’s craft beer industry has the potential to bring in visitors to benefit all area restaurants. “We feel like it’s a hot spot for craft beer and if the East End is becoming a place where wine and beer enthusiasts are coming to visit for the weekend, they may have a meal with us,” he said, “but they’ll also go to other locations and have meals. We want to make sure all the restaurants are going to succeed. “Some places don’t [understand] that and it’s unfortunate. We’re not looking to take food out of restaurant owners’ mouths.” gvolpe@timesreview.com[%content%][%permalink%]http://magazine.timesreview.com/liwinepress/2013/02/23/brew-pub-style-restaurant-in-the-works-for-peconic/[%permalink%][%image%]http://media.timesreview.com.s3.amazonaws.com/suffolktimes/files/TR0221_beer_side1_gv_C.jpg[%image%][%excerpt%]Though the Greenport Harbor Brewing Company is still taking baby steps to get the its Peconic location up and running, owner Rich Vandenburgh has not stopped dreaming big. The Southold resident told The Suffolk Times he’d like to run a brew-pub-style restaurant at the property. “The property is just under three acres so we’d have […][%excerpt%][%category%]Food,Lifestyle[%category%][%categoryid%]5,8[%categoryid%][%site%]http://magazine.timesreview.com/liwinepress[%site%][%title%]How some restaurants benefit from closing in winter[%title%][%author%]Gianna Volpe[%author%][%date%]February 23, 2013[%date%][%content%][caption id="attachment_43530" align="aligncenter" width="500"] BARBARAELLEN KOCH PHOTO | Grana Wood Fired Pizza owner and chef David Plath was back at work last Thursday after closing since the end of December.[/caption] The recent blizzard was hefty enough to close down the Long Island Expressway throughout all of Suffolk, so it’s easy to imagine why some local restaurants find it prudent to shut their doors for a period of time during the colder season. “Last week was an example of why so many businesses close during winter,” said Dianne Delaney, general manager at Comtesse Thérèse Bistro in Aquebogue. “We live in such an unpredictable climate. We closed for January. The first weekend we were open was a wild success. Then we didn’t even open this past weekend because of the snow.” Snow or not, Comtesse Thérèse executive chef Arie Pavlou said there are other, non-fi nancial benefits to closing shop for a time. “It gives you a chance to recharge your batteries,” Mr. Pavlou said. “It can get very monotonous out here without a break.” Chef and co-owner Noah Schwartz of Noah’s in Greenport said it’s customary for him to close his business during the first two weeks of January. “Typically we’ve found January to be the slowest time, especially in Greenport,” Mr. Schwartz said. “It helps labor costs because we don’t have staff to not earn any money, but we try to give our staff as many hours as possible. Closing can be hard on the staff who rely on us for year-round income, so we try not to stay closed for too long.” Business owners often use the downtime to complete renovation projects or even travel to fi nd culinary inspiration. “Last year we closed for two weeks and this year we took five weeks to put in some bench seating, paint the entire place and finish the bar,” said owner David Plath of Grana in Jamesport. “It was an ideal time to freshen up and to travel around Italy getting ideas for ingredients and dishes.” Mr. Plath said he got the idea to serve truffled fondue during his most recent trip abroad in January, along with other appetizers that he’ll begin rolling out in the coming weeks. “One is a lightly fried cod and the other is a chi-chi bean puree that is like an Italian version of hummus,” he said. “I got some great ideas and also got to check out a supplier I’m interested in while I was there. He also said he’s now feeling refreshed as he gathers momentum to get Grana back up and running. “Sometimes getting up and going again is like trying to move a thousand-pound elephant,” he said with a laugh. Instead of just taking a few weeks off, it’s financially necessary for some restaurants to be strictly seasonal, said local restaurateur Adam Lovett of Greenport’s A Lure. “We’ve tried to stay open during the winter but it just doesn’t make sense with the location and the size of the building and kitchen,” Mr. Lovett said. “It’s not in downtown Southold or Greenport so there’s no foot traffic. It’s out in the middle of a marina that’s closed and the fact of the matter is people don’t always think to have dinner at a waterfront seafood restaurant in February.” Though he said closing for the season is important for A Lure’s financial survival, Mr. Lovett said the opposite is true for A Mano, his smaller, high-end Italian eatery in Mattituck. Mr. Lovett said when other area businesses close for the winter, A Mano begins to pick up speed. “A Mano has a comfortable, wintery feel and when other people close down, we remain pretty busy,” he said. “Ben Suglia at Mattituck Laundry tells me restaurants that stay open during the winter do better in the summer — and who am I to argue? He does a lot of restaurants’ linens in the area and the guy that does your linens knows exactly what business you’re doing.” gvolpe@timesreview.com[%content%][%permalink%]http://magazine.timesreview.com/liwinepress/2013/02/23/how-some-restaurants-benefit-from-closing-in-winter/[%permalink%][%image%]http://media.timesreview.com.s3.amazonaws.com/riverheadnewsreview/files/R0214_BIZ_Winter_BE_C.jpg[%image%][%excerpt%]The recent blizzard was hefty enough to close down the Long Island Expressway throughout all of Suffolk, so it’s easy to imagine why some local restaurants find it prudent to shut their doors for a period of time during the colder season. “Last week was an example of why so many businesses close during winter,” […][%excerpt%][%category%]Featured,Food,Lifestyle[%category%][%categoryid%]4,5,8[%categoryid%][%site%]http://magazine.timesreview.com/liwinepress[%site%][%title%]Jazz on the Vine ‘exactly what the winter needs’[%title%][%author%]Carrie Miller[%author%][%date%]February 17, 2013[%date%][%content%][caption id="attachment_38078" align="aligncenter" width="500"] CARRIE MILLER PHOTO | Katie O’Callaghan and Steve Messemer of Manhattan listened from the back of a crowded tasting room as the Spherical Flamenco Jazz Trio performed at Pellegrini Vineyards Saturday afternoon.[/caption] Snow flurries fell as wine lovers and jazz musicians kicked off Winterfest’s Jazz on the Vine series Saturday afternoon. Originally scheduled to start Feb. 8, the series was postponed by last weekend’s blizzard. Going on its sixth straight year, the Jazz on the Vine series is designed to bring visitors to the North Fork during the winter season. It will feature more than 80 concerts at local vineyards. Events are also scheduled at the newly renovated Suffolk Theater, Hotel Indigo and the Hilton Garden Inn in Riverhead. “In the dead of winter, to see a full tasting room, it’s amazing,” said John Larsen, tasting room manager at Pellegrini Vineyards in Cutchogue. “It makes the winter go by that much quicker.” Related: Jazz on the Vine schedule Pellegrini Vineyards featured a Spherical Flamenco Jazz Trio, with Emma Larsson also performing. “It’s nice to be able to sit, listen, and enjoy a glass of wine,” said Katie O’Callaghan, who traveled from Manhattan with Steve Messemer to enjoy a Valentine’s Day weekend. “This is great, the place especially,” Ms. O’Callaghan said. “The acoustics are great, and its not all traditional jazz. It's nice they do a different style.” “The fact that it's actually snowing adds to the charm,” Mr. Messemer said. “This is something we will definitely make into a yearly thing.” The couple had never been to a Jazz on the Vine event before. Pellegrini Vineyards will be hosting three other events throughout the series, Mr. Larsen said. The Mike Engle Vibratrio, a three-man band led by Mike Engle, performed at Palmer Vineyards in Aquebogue Saturday. It was the band’s first time performing in the Jazz on the Vine series. “We’re loving it,” said Keenan Zach, who plays bass. “It’s a great atmosphere. Exactly what the winter needs.” “It’s inspiring to see so many people,” added Mike Engle, who described the trio’s music as “organic, spontaneous, but rooted in tradition.” Mr. Engle said he would be honored to play in the series again. “They are so nice and they sound great,” said Robin Helmer-Reich, who was cuddled up in a booth, sipping on red wine and listening close by. “Jazz on the Vine is a great program.” This was the second year Ms. Helmer-Reich, of Center Moriches, has attended the series. “It’s a great thing to do in the dead of winter, when there aren’t too many choices of what to do.” Blanche Pesc traveled from Rockville Center with her husband Dan and their dog to enjoy the afternoon. “Every time we’ve come it’s been a great experience,” Ms. Pesc said. “You always end up meeting great people.” Last year’s series brought more than 7,500 people to the North Fork, up from 6,000 in 2011. Events cost $20 at the door and include a glass of wine. You also get the chance to win a free night’s stay at an East End hotel with a gift basket of Long Island wines. The events originally scheduled for the weekend of Feb. 8-10 have been postponed until March 22-24, extending the series another week. Winterfest is produced by East End Arts, the Long Island Wine Council, the Long Island Convention and Visitors Bureau and the Suffolk County Office of Economic Development. For more information visit www.liwinterfest.com. cmiller@timesreview.com[%content%][%permalink%]http://magazine.timesreview.com/liwinepress/2013/02/17/jazz-on-the-vine-exactly-what-the-winter-needs/[%permalink%][%image%]http://media.timesreview.com.s3.amazonaws.com/suffolktimes/files/Pellegrini.jpg[%image%][%excerpt%]Snow flurries fell as wine lovers and jazz musicians kicked off Winterfest’s Jazz on the Vine series Saturday afternoon. Originally scheduled to start Feb. 8, the series was postponed by last weekend’s blizzard. Going on its sixth straight year, the Jazz on the Vine series is designed to bring visitors to the North Fork during the winter […][%excerpt%][%category%]Events,Featured,Lifestyle,Wine[%category%][%categoryid%]7,4,8,6[%categoryid%][%site%]http://magazine.timesreview.com/liwinepress[%site%][%title%]Video: Frisky Oyster unveils absinthe mojito[%title%][%author%]Gianna Volpe[%author%][%date%]February 17, 2013[%date%][%content%][caption id="attachment_38072" align="aligncenter" width="500"] Robert Beaver, owner of the Frisky Oyster, created an absinthe mojito for his Greenport restaurant.[/caption] Robert Beaver, the 35-year-old executive chef and owner of The Frisky Oyster, unleashed the Green Fairy on the North Fork Valentine's Day, when he began selling absinthe mojitos at his Greenport restaurant. "Absinthe itself was intriguing to me because of the mystery of it," Mr. Beaver said of the controversial liquor, which is rumored to cause hallucinations. "It was first found in Switzerland and moved to France where it became popular among artists, which interested me because it was drank among the inner circles of writers and artists. It wasn't widely known." The brand of absinthe carried at The Frisky Oyster, Absente, advertises itself on its website as the "first legal absinthe recipe in the U.S. since 1912." In addition to mojitos, Mr. Beaver said along with his wife Shannon, they developed an absinthe ice cream that is used to top one of their dessert items, a chocolate ginger cake. Watch a video below of Mr. Beaver preparing one of their signature absinthe mojitos and pick up a copy of next week's Suffolk Times for more on this story. [%content%][%permalink%]http://magazine.timesreview.com/liwinepress/2013/02/17/video-frisky-oyster-unveils-absinthe-mojito/[%permalink%][%image%]http://media.timesreview.com.s3.amazonaws.com/suffolktimes/files/Beaver.jpg[%image%][%excerpt%]Robert Beaver, the 35-year-old executive chef and owner of The Frisky Oyster, unleashed the Green Fairy on the North Fork Valentine’s Day, when he began selling absinthe mojitos at his Greenport restaurant. “Absinthe itself was intriguing to me because of the mystery of it,” Mr. Beaver said of the controversial liquor, which is rumored to […][%excerpt%][%category%]Featured,Lifestyle[%category%][%categoryid%]4,8[%categoryid%][%site%]http://magazine.timesreview.com/liwinepress[%site%]